Skip to Main Content

Wayne G. Basler Library

Search the Catalog

Search multiple databases and the library catalog.

Type in keywords, titles, or authors to find what the library has to offer on your topic.

Get Help


Contact Us

Get Started


Research Guides

Get Answers


FAQs

Get More


Interlibrary Loan

QuickLinks

Virtual Library Display - “Native American Heritage" eBooks available from eBook Central

The Victory with No Name: The Native American Defeat of the First American Army

In 1791, General Arthur St. Clair led the United States army in a campaign to destroy a complex of Indian villages at the Maumee River in northwestern Ohio. Almost within reach of their objective, St. Clair's 1,400 men were attacked by about one thousand Indians. The U.S. force was decimated, suffering nearly one thousand casualties in killed and wounded, while Indian casualties numbered only a few dozen. But despite the lopsided result, it wouldn't appear to carry much significance; it involved only a few thousand people, lasted less than three hours, and the outcome, which was never in doubt, was permanently reversed a mere three years later. Neither an epic struggle nor a clash that changed the course of history, the battle doesn't even have a name. Yet, as renowned Native American historian Colin Calloway demonstrates here, St. Clair's Defeat--as it came to be known-- was hugely important for its time. It was both the biggest victory the Native Americans ever won, and, proportionately, the biggest military disaster the United States had suffered. With the British in Canada waiting in the wings for the American experiment in republicanism to fail, and some regions of the West gravitating toward alliance with Spain, the defeat threatened the very existence of the infant United States. Generating a deluge of reports, correspondence, opinions, and debates in the press, it produced the first congressional investigation in American history, while ultimately changing not only the manner in which Americans viewed, raised, organized, and paid for their armies, but the very ways in which they fought their wars. Emphasizing the extent to which the battle has been overlooked in history, Calloway illustrates how this moment of great victory by American Indians became an aberration in the national story and a blank spot in the national memory. Calloway shows that St. Clair's army proved no match for the highly motivated and well-led Native American force that shattered not only the American army but the ill-founded assumption that Indians stood no chance against European methods and models of warfare. An engaging and enlightening read for American history enthusiasts and scholars alike, The Victory with No Name brings this significant moment in American history back to light.

Indians and Wannabes: Native American Powwow Dancing in the Northeast and Beyond

Colloquially the term "powwow" refers to a meeting where important matters will be discussed. However, at the thousands of Native American intertribal dances that occur every year throughout the United States and Canada, a powwow means something else altogether. Sometimes lasting up to a week, these social gatherings are a sacred tradition central to Native American spirituality. Attendees dance, drum, sing, eat, re-establish family ties, and make new friends. In this compelling interdisciplinary work, Ann Axtmann examines powwows as practiced primarily along the Atlantic coastline, from New Jersey to New England. She offers an introduction to the many complexities of the tradition and explores the history of powwow performance, the variety of their setups, the dances themselves, and the phenomenon of "playing Indian." Ultimately, Axtmann seeks to understand how the dancers express and embody power through their moving bodies and what the dances signify for the communities in which they are performed.

Family Life in Native America

This volume provides insight into the family life of Native Americans of the northeast quadrant of the North American continent and those living in the adjacent coastal and piedmont regions. These Native Americans were among the most familiar to Euro-colonials for more than two centuries. From the tribes of the northeast woodlands came "great hunters, fishermen, farmers, and fighters, as well as the most powerful and sophisticated Indian nation north of Mexico [the Iroquois Confederacy].

Our Stories Remember: American Indian History, Culture, and Values through Storytelling

An illuminating look at Native origins and lifeways, a treasure for all who value Native wisdom and the stories that keep it alive.

The Frontier Newspapers and the Coverage of the Plains Indian Wars

The Frontier Newspapers and the Coverage of the Plains Indian Wars takes readers back to the late 19th century to show how newspaper reporting impacted attitudes toward the conflict between the United States and Native Americans. Emphasizing primary sources and eyewitness accounts, the book focuses on eight watershed events between 1862 and 1891--the Great Sioux Uprising in Minnesota, the Sand Creek Massacre, the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868, the Battle of the Little Big Horn, the Flight of the Nez Perce, the Cheyenne Outbreak, the Trial of Standing Bear, and the Massacre at Wounded Knee in 1890 and its aftermath. Each chapter examines an individual event, analyzing the balance and accuracy of the newspaper coverage and how the reporting of the time reinforced stereotypes about Native Americans.

Rights Remembered: A Salish Grandmother Speaks on American Indian History and the Future

Rights Remembered is a remarkable historical narrative and autobiography written by esteemed Lummi elder and culture bearer Pauline R. Hillaire, Scälla–Of the Killer Whale. A direct descendant of the immediate postcontact generation of Coast Salish in Washington State, Hillaire combines in her narrative life experiences, Lummi oral traditions preserved and passed on to her, and the written record of relationships between the United States and the indigenous peoples of the Northwest Coast to tell the story of settlers, government officials, treaties, reservations, and the colonial relationship between Coast Salish and the white newcomers. Hillaire’s autobiography, although written out of frustration with the status of Native peoples in America, is not an expression of anger but rather represents, in her own words, her hope “for greater justice for Indian people in America, and for reconciliation between Indian and non-Indian Americans, based on recognition of the truths of history.” Addressed to indigenous and non-Native peoples alike, this is a thoughtful call for understanding and mutual respect between cultures.

Horace Poolaw, Photographer of American Indian Modernity

Laura E. Smith unravels the compelling life story of Kiowa photographer Horace Poolaw (1906–84), one of the first professional Native American photographers. Born on the Kiowa reservation in Anadarko, Oklahoma, Poolaw bought his first camera at the age of fifteen and began taking photos of family, friends, and noted leaders in the Kiowa community, also capturing successive years of powwows and pageants at various fairs, expositions, and other events. Though Poolaw earned some income as a professional photographer, he farmed, raised livestock, and took other jobs to help fund his passion for documenting his community. Smith examines the cultural and artistic significance of Poolaw’s life in professional photography from 1925 to 1945 in light of European and modernist discourses on photography, portraiture, the function of art, Native American identity, and American Indian religious and political activism. Rather than through the lens of Native peoples’ inevitable extinction or within a discourse of artistic modernism, Smith evaluates Poolaw’s photography within art history and Native American history, simultaneously questioning the category of “fine artist” in relation to the creative lives of Native peoples. A tour de force of art and cultural history, Horace Poolaw, Photographer of American Indian Modernity illuminates the life of one of Native America’s most gifted, organic artists and documentarians and challenges readers to reevaluate the seamlessness between the creative arts and everyday life through its depiction of one man’s lifelong dedication to art and community.

American Indians in the Early West

American Indians in the Early West offers a concise guide to the development of American Indian communities, from the first migrations through the arrival of the Spanish, French, and Russians, to the appearance of Anglo-American traders in the easternmost portions of the West around 1800. With coverage divided into periods and regions, American Indians in the Early West looks at how Indian communities evolved from hunter-gatherers to culturally recognized tribes and examines the critical encounters of those tribes with non-Natives over the next two-and-a-half centuries. Readers will see that the issues at stake in those encounters--political control, preserving traditions, land and water rights, resistance to economic and military pressures--are very relevant to the Native American experience today.

Custerology : The Enduring Legacy of the Indian Wars and George Armstrong Custer

On a hot summer day in 1876, George Armstrong Custer led the Seventh Cavalry to the most famous defeat in U.S. military history. Outnumbered and exhausted, the Seventh Cavalry lost more than half of its 400 men, and every soldier under Custer’s direct command was killed. It’s easy to understand why this tremendous defeat shocked the American public at the time. But with Custerology, Michael A. Elliott tackles the far more complicated question of why the battle still haunts the American imagination today. Weaving vivid historical accounts of Custer at Little Bighorn with contemporary commemorations that range from battle reenactments to the unfinished Crazy Horse memorial, Elliott reveals a Custer and a West whose legacies are still vigorously contested. He takes readers to each of the important places of Custer’s life, from his Civil War home in Michigan to the site of his famous demise, and introduces us to Native American activists, Park Service rangers, and devoted history buffs along the way. Elliott shows how Custer and the Indian Wars continue to be both a powerful symbol of America’s bloody past and a crucial key to understanding the nation’s multicultural present. “[Elliott] is an approachable guide as he takes readers to battlefields where Custer fought American Indians . . . to the Michigan town of Monroe that Custer called home after he moved there at age 10 . . . to the Black Hills of South Dakota where Custer led an expedition that gave birth to a gold rush."—Steve Weinberg, Atlanta Journal-Constitution “By ‘Custerology,’ Elliott means the historical interpretation and commemoration of Custer and the Indian Wars in which he fought not only by those who honor Custer but by those who celebrate the Native American resistance that defeated him. The purpose of this book is to show how Custer and the Little Bighorn can be and have been commemorated for such contradictory purposes.”—Library Journal “Michael Elliott’s Custerology is vivid, trenchant, engrossing, and important. The American soldier George Armstrong Custer has been the subject of very nearly incessant debate for almost a century and a half, and the debate is multicultural, multinational, and multimedia. Mr. Elliott's book provides by far the best overview, and no one interested in the long-haired soldier whom the Indians called Son of the Morning Star can afford to miss it.”—Larry McMurtry

The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southwest

A major work on the history and culture of Southwest Indians, The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southwest tells a remarkable story of cultural continuity in the face of migration, displacement, violence, and loss. The Native peoples of the American Southwest are a unique group, for while the arrival of Europeans forced many Native Americans to leave their land behind, those who lived in the Southwest held their ground. Many still reside in their ancestral homes, and their oral histories, social practices, and material artifacts provide revelatory insight into the history of the region and the country as a whole. Trudy Griffin-Pierce incorporates her lifelong passion for the people of the Southwest, especially the Navajo, into an absorbing narrative of pre- and postcontact Native experiences. She finds that, even though the policies of the U.S. government were meant to promote assimilation, Native peoples formed their own response to outside pressures, choosing to adapt rather than submit to external change. Griffin-Pierce provides a chronology of instances that have shaped present-day conditions in the region, as well as an extensive glossary of significant people, places, and events. Setting a precedent for ethical scholarship, she describes different methods for researching the Southwest and cites sources for further archaeological and comparative study. Completing the volume is a selection of key primary documents, literary works, films, Internet resources, and contact information for each Native community, enabling a more thorough investigation into specific tribes and nations. The Columbia Guides to American Indian History and Culture also include: The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Great Plains Loretta Fowler The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Northeast Kathleen J. Bragdon The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast Theda Perdue and Michael D. Green

The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast

Though they speak several different languages and organize themselves into many distinct tribes, the Native American peoples of the Southeast share a complex ancient culture and a tumultuous history. This volume examines and synthesizes their history through each of its integral phases: the complex and elaborate societies that emerged and flourished in the Pre-Columbian period; the triple curse of disease, economic dependency, and political instability brought by the European invasion; the role of Native Americans in the inter-colonial struggles for control of the region; the removal of the "Five Civilized Tribes" to Oklahoma; the challenges and adaptations of the post-removal period; and the creativity and persistence of those who remained in the Southeast.

Survival Skills of the North American Indians

This comprehensive review of Native American life skills covers collecting and preparing plant foods and medicines; hunting animals; creating and transporting fire; and crafting tools, shelter, clothing, utensils, and other devices. Step-by-step instructions and 145 detailed diagrams enable the reader to duplicate native methods using materials available in local habitats. A new foreword, introduction, and index complement the practical information offered.

Featured

Getting Started with Research

Learn about the research process from topic to writing and citing. Find information about locating sources such as books, articles, and films.

OverDrive eBook and eAudioBook Collection

Learn how to access and use the library's eBook collection on OverDrive.

Library Calendars

Library Displays Calendar

Library Events Calendar

KCHE Displays Calendar

Virtual Library Display - "Gobble Up Some Gourmet Reading" - eBooks available from OverDrive

Pie Academy

Trusted cookbook author and pie expert Ken Haedrich delivers the only pie cookbook you’ll ever need: Pie Academy. Novice and experienced bakers will discover the secrets to baking a pie from scratch, with recipes, crust savvy, tips and tutorials, advice about tools and ingredients, and more. Foolproof step-by-step photos give you the confidence you need to choose and prepare the best crust for different types of fillings. Learn how to make pie dough using butter, lard, or both; how to work with all-purpose, whole-wheat, or gluten-free flour; how to roll out dough; which pie pan to use; and how to add flawless finishing details like fluting and lattice tops. Next are 255 recipes for every kind and style of pie, from classic apple pie and pumpkin pie to summer berry, fruit, nut, custard, chiffon, and cream pies, freezer pies, slab pies, hand pies, turnovers, and much more. This beast of a collection, with gorgeous color photos throughout, weighs in at nearly four pounds and serves up forty years of pie wisdom in a single, satisfying package.

Fix-It and Forget-It Holiday Favorites: 150 Easy and Delicious Slow Cooker Recipes

What if you could prepare holiday feasts for friends and family without spending hours in the kitchen? Now you can. Take your slow cooker out of the pantry and put away the stress of holiday cooking and baking this year. Here are 150 slow cooker recipes that will wow your guests and free you up to spend quality time with loved ones. From Sweet Potato Stuffing to Raspberry Glazed Ham, Slow Cooker Turkey and Stuffing to Pear Butter, there are recipes here to indulge every palate and gorgeous full-color photographs to inspire any menu planner. Phyllis Good is beloved for providing recipes that are simple and made with ingredients you can find easily—if you don't already have them in your cupboard. Who has time to search for obscure, gourmet ingredients around the holidays? Holiday cooking has never been easier—or more delicious. Learn what size slow cooker to purchase, discover tips for easy prep and cleanup, and find scrumptious recipes such as:
Dried Cranberry Pudding
Holiday Wild Rice
Christmas Apple Date Pudding
Pork Roast with Applesauce
Cheesy Sausage Dip
Gingerbread Pudding Cake
And many more!

Muffins and Biscuits: 50 Recipes to Start Your Day with a Smile

Whether slathered with mouthwatering homemade spreads or savored just as they are, muffins and biscuits are comfort food at its finest. This follow-up to the successful Grilled Cheese Kitchen features 50 recipes for tender-on-the-inside, crunchy-on-the-outside biscuits and melt-in-your-mouth muffins as well as an irresistible assortment of flavored butters, sauces, and preserves. Featuring sweet and savory varieties and exciting new flavor combinations—think Quinoa Muffins with Cheddar, Apples, and Rosemary or Orange Zest, Ham, and Thyme Biscuits—bakers of all skill levels will delight in these fresh twists on classic treats. Packed with tips and tricks, from making delectable pancakes with muffin batter to turning leftover biscuits into bread pudding, this collection of recipes takes time-tested breakfast favorites to an entirely new level of deliciousness.

Vegetarian Cookbooks: 70 of the Best Ever Complete Book of Vegetarian Recipes for Every Meal... Revealed!

Do you want to learn all there is about vegetarian 101? Are you wondering what this lifestyle entails or have you recently become a vegetarian but is limited on the number of vegetarian meals you can prepare? Are you about to host a vegetarian party? Does the idea of learning how to prepare over 70 different vegetarian meals entice you? This book is for you. It has all the inside information on who a vegetarian is, how to live a vegetarian lifestyle, how to prepare delicious vegetarian dishes and as so much more. In fact, if you are not a vegetarian, by the time you are through with the book, you will want to become one. Contrary to what many people think, the vegetarian lifestyle is not a boring one. It is possible to have fun especially when you have many different recipes you can try out. This is the ultimate 101 vegetarian recipes guidebook. These will add variety and fun to your meal times. The recipes help you prepare vegetarian dishes for different occasions, different age groups and for people with special diet needs. They are all very easy to understand and prepare. Each recipe is well detailed to help you through the whole process. With the instructions, it is hard to make mistakes. If you have no idea of what the vegetarian lifestyle is all about, this book is a perfect read. You will learn what being a vegetarian entails, 101 reasons to be vegetarian and how to enjoy the lifestyle. Sometimes, circumstances may force one to become a vegetarian. This is especially if there are health issues involved. Being forced to adapt this lifestyle can be very frustrating especially if you had no prior knowledge of how vegetarians live their lives. Simple tasks such as choosing the right meals in restaurants can be very daunting. This does not have to be the case when you get this book. After getting the book, whether you are a new or a seasoned vegetarian, your life will never be the same again. This book details 101 reasons to be a vegetarian. Once you go through them, it will be easier for you to embrace or adapt to being a vegetarian. You will have 101 reasons to go vegetarian that you can share with friends and family members. The immense knowledge you will get from this book will help you be there for others who are struggling to adapt to the lifestyle. Many people think that you cannot have a delicious meal as a vegetarian. Others think that there are very few recipes available for vegetarians. This book proves them wrong. It helps vegetarians discover many recipes that are not only healthy but are delicious too. This is the book you need to get if you want to enjoy your meals and at the same time not worry about eating the wrong foods. This book is not only for the vegetarian, but it is for everyone who wants to bring fun and variety to their mealtimes. For all there is to vegetarian 101 this is the book to get.

Eva's Kitchen: Cooking with Love for Family and Friends: A Cookbook

Eva Longoria may be most recognized for her role as Desperate Housewives’ saucy Gabrielle Solis, but on her own time, there are few places she would rather be than in the kitchen, cooking the food she loves for her family and friends.

The recipes in Eva’s Kitchen trace her life story, taking readers on her culinary journey—from the food she was brought up on to the recipes inspired by her travels abroad to the dishes she serves during casual nights at home. Eva believes that good cooking relies on local, fresh, easy-to-find ingredients. Offering 100 of her favorite dishes—many of which are family recipes collected over the years—all fused with her passion for cooking, Eva teaches readers essential cooking skills and she sprinkles in the histories and traditions behind her favorite dishes, including personal stories and anecdotes that capture the warmth, humor, and joy of her most memorable meals.

Inspired by her heritage,...

A Cook's Journey to Japan: 100 Homestyle Recipes from Japanese Kitchens

Cook delicious and authentic Japanese meals in the comfort of your own home with this easy-to-use homestyle Japanese cookbook!
At twenty-eight years of age, Sarah Marx Feldner quit her job, sold her house, and moved to Japan to pursue her passion for Japanese food and cooking. A Cook's Journey to Japan is the result of her adventures traveling throughout Japan, sampling home-cooked meals and collecting recipes from Japanese friends and avid cooks she met along the way. A Cook's Journey to Japan is a totally unique Japanese cookbook that tells the story of the everyday dishes that Japanese people eat at home—including many popular standards such as:
• Salmon Teriyaki
• Tonkatsu
• Chicken Yakitori
• Sushi Hand Rolls
• Miso Soup with Baby Clams
• Yaki Udon (Stir-Fried Noodles)
The difference is that these homestyle dishes are ones you will never see in any other cookbook. And as we know, foods prepared at home by experienced cooks are far tastier—and also more healthy—than the restaurant versions found in most Japanese cooking books.
Sarah's fascinating stories about her travels, and her heartfelt and sometimes humorous insights about the people she met who shared their recipes and kitchens with her will entice you to take up your knife and cutting board to begin your own journey through the kitchens of Japan. Her detailed menu suggestions, clear instructions and reassuring tone make it incredibly easy to prepare delicious Japanese cuisine in your own kitchen at home just the way the Japanese do.

Japanese Homestyle Dishes: Quick and Delicious Favorites

Enjoy fresh and delicious Japanese meals with the ease of cooking in your own kitchen!
Few home cooks prepare the dishes typically served in restaurants, and nowhere is that more true than in Japan. Fortunately, Japanese Homestyle Cooking introduces Western taste buds to the flavorful, delicious, and easy-to-prepare foods that Japanese home cooks make every day for family and friends.
Readers will delight in this easy-to-follow Japanese cookbook's step-by-step recipes—including how to use a rice cooker—and their families will love trying tasty new dishes such as sukiyaki, shabu-shabu, and teppanyaki. Many home style Japanese dishes are meat-free and instead feature seafood or tofu along with a wide variety of vegetables, making them perfect for vegetarians. Accessible and simple to master, the over 80 recipes in Japanese Homestyle Cooking are as authentic as they are delicious.
Homestyle Japanese recipes include:

• Classic Miso Soup with Tofu and Mushrooms
• Sukiyaki Beef Hotpot
• Seasame Omelet Rolls with Shrimp
• Grilled Yakitori Chicken Skewers
• Japanese Grilled Steak
• Smoked Trout Sushi Rolls
• Hand-rolled Sushi Cones with Ginger Chicken
And many more!
From seafood dishes to using a rice cooker, Japanese Homestyle Cooking will bring a wonderful depth of flavor and many tasty new foods to your table.